9903. Conococheague Aqueduct

To  get  the  C&O  Canal  over  the  Conococheague  Creek,  the  C&O  Canal  Company  built  an  aqueduct,  or  bridge  for  carrying  water,  to  float  boats  literally  about  16  feet  above  the  creek  bed  below.  The  aqueduct  was  made  out  of  limestone  obtained  from  quarries  close  by.  And  when  it  opened  in  1834,  it  was  about  200  feet  long  and  had  three  arches  for  support.  It  was  repaired  in  the  early  1870's,  and  functioned  pretty  well,  until  one  fateful  day.
Captain  Frank  Myers  had  just  unloaded  his  boat  here  in  Williamsport  and  was  beginning  the  trip  west  back  up  to  Cumberland.  On  the  morning  of  April  20,  1920,  he  was  steering  his  boat,  #73,  into  the  Conococheague  Creek  Aqueduct.  Up  ahead,  his  stepson,  Joseph,  was  driving  a  three-mule  team  on  the  aqueduct  when  the  boat  struck  the  east  end  of  the  berm  wall.  Captain  Myers  saw  the  stone  wall  begin  to  waver.  The  mules  were  about  at  the  other  end  of  the  aqueduct  when  Myers  yelled  to  his  son,  "Cut  the  line!  Cut  the  towline!"
Captain  Myers  then  jumped  from  the  boat  onto  the  east  end  of  the  berm  parapet  and  the  stone  wall  gave  way,  taking  boat  #73  down  into  the  creek.  But  Frank  and  Joseph,  and  all  three  mules,  were  safe  and  sound  on  shore.
The  canal  shut  down  for  four  months  after  that,  while  the  company  replaced  the  stone  wall  with  a  wooden  one.
Boat  73  stayed  stuck  in  the  creek  below  for  the  next  16  years  until  1936,  when  a  great  flood  washed  it  away,  down  into  the  Potomac.
Some  of  the  original  stone  was  pulled  from  the  creek  around  1980.  Look  inthe  canal  bed  at  the  western  end  of  the  aqueduct.  You  can  still  see  it.
Oh,  I  almost  forgot  to  tell  you,  the  aqueduct  was  a  favorite  swimming  hole  for  the  boys  here  in  town,  and  the  boatmen  didn't  much  appreciate  them.  They'd  yell  at  the  kids  to  get  out  of  the  water  so  the  mules  and  boats  could  pass.  How  about  that!
For more information on the Aqueduct and surrounding area, please click here:

http://www.canaltrust.org/discoveries/sites.php?siteID=22